The Flagstaff Festival of Science is a FREE 10-day event with field trips, guided hikes, star parties, open houses, hands-on exhibits, presentations and archaeological excavations!

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FLAGSTAFF LUNAR LEGACY

Experience the 50th anniversary of one of humankind’s grandest achievements in setting foot on the moon and celebrate Flagstaff's scientific role!

From July 2018 - December 2019, Flagstaff will be  offering free events and activities. The Lunar Legacy Speaker Series, sponsored by the Flagstaff Festival of Science, will run on the second Wednesday of each month starting with Lowell Observatory historian Kevin Schindler on Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018, at 6pm Coconino Community College Lone Tree Campus. For more information visit Flagstaff AZ Lunar Legacy.

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Teachers- free, curriculum-based education programs designed using AZ state and national education standards. FREE! Sign up before all the slots fill.Looking to bring Grand Canyon into your classroom? Here's your chance!

Registration for curriculum-based programs begins tomorrow, August 15th at 8am.

Visit: www.nps.gov/grca/learn/education/index.htm to register for field trips, classroom rangers and distance learning. -ap (NPS photos)

[Image description: Two photos, one of a volunteer park ranger teaching gesturing at a screen of watching students, one of a park ranger placing something in the hands of a child with a red baseball cap.]
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2 days ago  ·  

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Wow! “This is actually a real composite image of Saturn's moon, Dione- taken from NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn #OTD in 2015! That horizontal line in the background is not a defect, but Saturn's rings. The smooth gray background? That is Saturn.”While it may look like a ball of Styrofoam, this is actually a real composite image of Saturn's moon, Dione- taken from NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn #OTD in 2015! That horizontal line in the background is not a defect, but Saturn's rings. The smooth gray background? That is Saturn.

The photo was taken just prior to Cassini's final close approach to the moon. The view was acquired at distances ranging from approximately 170,000 kilometers (106,000 miles) to 63,000 kilometers (39,000 miles) from Dione. This was the fifth and final Cassini fly by of Dione.

Learn more about what Cassini found on its final approach to the moon: go.nasa.gov/2PhIYMM
(Be sure to check out the 1-minute video summary of the previous fly bys on this page.)
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3 days ago  ·  

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